Menard County Texas

Newspaper Articles Pertaining to WWI

The Menard Messenger
Vol. 10 No. 26
Thursday, May 3, 1917

(page 1)

VOLUNTEERS

Theodore Benchoff and Sam Smith left Tuesday for Ft. Worth where they expect to join the army; Ted the aviation corps while Sam wants to enter the army. Albert Mabry left last week. These are Menard's first contribution to America's great part in the war and will be followed within the next few days by others who will not wait for conscription.

GOVERNOR WIRES CONSCRIPTION ORDERS

F. M. Slaughter, Sheriff,
Menard, Texas
Acting under the direction of the president I request that you at once get in communication with the county judge, the clerk, the county physician and the presiding judges of the various voting precincts of your county and hold them in readiness for the next ten days within which time I will further communicate to you, direction from the president for the quiet enrollment of military age under the act of congress just passed. Where office of presiding judge is vacant arrange at once to fill place. Please acknowledge receipt by wire of this message.
Jas. E. Ferguson,
Governor.

The presiding judges are Will Hill, Will Chastain, John Pearl, Ed Lehne, Wa?t Key, F. Luckenbach, W. H. Haley and Russell Callan

The Menard Messenger
Vol. 10 No. 28
Thursday, May 17, 1917

(page 2)

WAR GROOMS NOT TO BE EXEMPT FROM MILITARY DUTY, WAR DEPARTMENT HAS ANNOUNCED

Washington, April 19,- Men of military age who have deserted the ranks of single blessedness and have taken unto themselves wife and helpmeet since the war with Germany will not escape their obligation to do military service, according to the war department's policy which was today formally announced.

The Menard Messenger
Vol. XI, No. 41
Thursday, August 29, 1918

(page 1)

Hugh Pullen Wounded
The parents of Hugh Pullen, one of Menard's drafted boys received word Saturday that Hugh had been wounded on the battlefield in France, but no information was given as to the seriousness of the wound or its nature. The message was received Saturday. Hugh was wounded on the 31st of July.

The Menard Messenger
Vol. XI, No. 43
Thursday, September 12, 1918

(page 6)

London, Texas
September 16, 1918

To the Editor of the Messenger:
I notice in your issue of the last the names of the soldier boys who have recently arrived in France. In the list I notice the name of Frank Leakey.
Frank enlisted in the U. S. Army about January the 1st, 1917, with the first American soldiers to go.
Frank Leakey was born in Kimble County, near London, August 16, 1900. When he arrived in France he was less than 17 years old. In July 1917, I claimed through the columns of the San Antonio Express that Frank was the youngest U. S. soldier in France and that I was the youngest grandfather in Texas with a grandson in the service of Uncle Sam in France; (Frank is my grandson). I was born December 6th, 1858.
This claim has never been disputed, so I still make the claim.
Frank was partially reared in Menard county. His mother, Mrs. Jessie Nixon (formerly Mrs. Geo. Leakey) now lives on Saline in Menard County.
Frank's cousin, Hubert Miles of Leakey, Texas, was killed in action on the 15th of March last. He fell fighting by the side of Frank.
No, dear Messenger, Frank is not a new arrival in France. On the contrary, I claim for him that he was the first U. S. soldier to reach the battlefields of Europe from Menard or Kimble counties. In conclusion will say many of the good people of Menard knew Frank when he was a little boy as his father lived in that town for several years. And believing they would like to hear from him and to correct what might me an error prompted me to write this.
Best wishes for the Messenger and his household,
I am very truly your,
F. M. Adams

(page 8)

Mrs. S. H. Pullen has received a letter from her son, Hugh, who was wounded in France on the 31st of July. He was shot thru the mouth and the bullet lodged in his neck. He is now getting along nicely and expects to get back to his company in a month or two.

The Menard Messenger
Vol. XI, No. 46
Thursday, October 3, 1918

(page 1)

Ship Minnesota Hits Submerged Mine
The Associated Press announced Monday that the battleship Minnesota had hit a submerged mine but was proceeding to port under its own power. One of Menard's boys, Milton Rogers is serving on this battleship. It is glad news to hear that no lives were lost. Milton is the son of Jim Rogers.

The Menard Messenger
Vol. XI, No. 47
Thursday, October 10, 1918

Word was received here last week that Paul Irby, one of Menard's first contributions to the army was seriously wounded in France. The nature of his wound is unknown. (continued below)

The Menard Messenger
Vol. XI, No. 48
Thursday, October 17, 1918

Jefty Irby
Word came last week that Jefty Irby who joined the colors from Menard had died of disease in France, instead of being wounded as was first reported. Mr. Irby's parents when last heard from were living in Center Point.

The Menard Messenger
Vol. XII, No. 4
Thursday, December 12, 1918
(page 4)

Alvin D. Baker was reported in the casualty columns as being wounded, degree undetermined. Alvin is the son of Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Baker of the Ft. McKavett community but was inducted into the service from Schleicher county.

 

NOTE:  While I strive for accuracy in all transcriptions, please be advised that typing errors may be present.  I would suggest you always verify my online information with a copy of the actual record.

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